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Brainchild

A spotlight on 2 Bright Grade 8 Oakville Entrepreneurs

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Came home the other day to find a flyer taped to my front door. After checking to make sure I hadn’t time- travelled back to 1983 before such old school marketing was trumped by SEO-ing and email blasting, I gently peeled, had a quick read—then bought in BIG TIME!

It was from 2 grade 8 students at our local public school. For privacy’s sake let’s call them AA (like the battery;). In their ‘Economy’ unit in Geography class, they had been given the task of stepping into the shoes of an entrepreneur and coming up with a business proposal for a product they might want to create. The project would cumulate with at ‘Dragon’s Den’ type presentation by the students to a panel of guest judges.

So, already a pretty cool assignment—but AA wanted to step it up a notch. They decided to create a REAL product, and put it out to market through the Google Play Store. So, while one of the A’s furiously coded (Grade 8’s with furious coding abilities—hello? Guess it really is 2013!) the other dove head first into developing a company name and logo. When it was all said and done, they both put together the description for their product, and, like the old nursery rhyme says—this little app-ie went to market!!

So far, the ‘Flashlight Infinity’ app has over a dozen downloads. Meaning that ‘Infinity Apps’ has done in a few short weeks what it takes some start-ups YEARS to do— bring in revenue — But more importantly, they took complete and total OWNership of that assignment. What could have been seen as mundane they chose to make exciting; what could have been seen as a chore, they chose to make a labour of love; what could have been seen as just another mark to go into their teacher’s spreadsheet, they chose to bring out of the world of the academic, and make it REAL.

And for that, ‘Infinity Apps’, ‘Flashlight Infinity’ and, of course AA, get the Nexed seal of approval, and a big ol’ fist bump for a job well done, and for reminding us who really is leading the charge into those outlying territories we keep mentioning!

And hey, if you have a buck, could use a flashlight, and want to support a coupla digital citizens peddling their wares in a 21st Century marketplace—click here to check out the app.

Finally, an encouraging story about kids and social media

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I heard a story today, at a time when stories get told. I have to call it a story because although it came from someone who I trust always to tell me the truth, I was a vice principal long enough to know that there are many versions of stories.

The story was about a middle school student who saw something on Instagram. Not something from a close friend, but a classmate who he ‘followed’.  He saw something that made him think this classmate was not ok. That they were talking about things and considering doing things that concerned and frightened him. The next thing he did was talk to his Mom; and show her what he had seen. The next day (today) that Mom talked to the child’s teacher, who talked to her principal, who talked to that child’s Mom. That child went home early from class today—to have ‘hot tea’.

And the p.s. to the story, again told at a(nother) time when they’re told—an iMessage group was in the process of being formed. And it was going to be a special group that made sure to include a certain someone—who looked like they could use a little chat time with friends.

We hear a LOT about the awfulness that can be kids and social media. And there’s no denying any of it. We need to be watchful and aware of how they’re using it; like we are watchful and aware of every part of their lives. But I betcha dollars to donuts that they’re using it for the better FAR more than they are for the worse.

So, while the vp in me reminds me that stories are just that—I kinda hope this one’s true.

Inspiring kids to create their own literary masterpieces

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Most days when I pick the kids up from school it’s bathroom, snack, then flop on the couch for a half hour of tv or iPad, or both, before settling in to homework time around the kitchen table. But the other day, my 11 year old surprised me by dusting off the kids’ ancient and massive (but still fully functional) laptop, and sitting at the kitchen table right away, forgoing snack and sofa. “What gives?” I asked.

What GAVE  was….http://www.bitstripsforschools.com

 

Alouette 1, Back on the Air

Alouette 1, Back on the Air

He and his class had been turned on to this by their awesome teacher, who had taken the time (and swallowed the expense) to set up her whole class (all 30 of them!) with Bitstrips. It is basically a way to create comic books online—my son prefers to refer to them as ‘graphic novels’ ;) It’s super easy to use, gives them lots of choices in terms of characters, backgrounds and props- they can even import their OWN photos or use the copyright free Flickr Image Search. Basically all the tools necessary to create some top notch comics—sorry, graphic novels, to either print out or share online with the other kids in his class.  No push to Facebook or Twitter yet—it’s actually kinda nice to know that somewhere, someone DOESN’T feel they need to get all their content into our massive social media karmic wheel.

And it’s also nice to know SOMEONE was inspired by our Chris Hadfield post a while back—cause now he’s full on into NASA and even obscure, lost in space Canadian satellites—

Check out  “Alouette 1, Back On the Air”